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20140426
20140504
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CSPAN 4
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CNNW 2
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
the juxtaposition of nazi germany with guernsey's ancient towns in narrow streets yet the channel islands guernsey and jersey alternately with the only pieces of british land captured in acute hide for five long years by the germans. i think we have a little catching up to do here. i will just carry on and we will catch up with it. i notice whenever i'm there that islanders have quite an emphasis on sound, the sound of martial music in their street, the ring of jack boots that echoed off the buildings of their high street and in that there is some sense of violation but also a fascination of this simple incongruity of the whole thing. now what was that oddness that always fascinated me ever since i started visiting guernsey in the 1970s. i was introduced to the island courtesy of my older sister who had the good sense to meet and marry a guernsey man. so i spent many years going back and forth to visit them. we were just going because it was such a beautiful place to visit. i was always struck when i went there gossip and rumor became new means of sending information around the island. they also s
by the principle that europe, germany, and united states could not wish for a more reliable partner respectively than we have in the transatlantic alliance. the alliance is a prime importance to all of us and this is the basis for our very close economic cooperation as well. the transatlantic economic the whole 15ure on million jobs on that side of the atlantic. it is indispensable. german companies alone a great in more than 600,000 jobs over haveand american companies created 800,000 jobs as of now. the u.s. chamber of commerce is an eloquent testament to these very close integrations of our tool economic areas. the world has changed incredibly. you have more of a political and theomic weight of economies, the overall framework of the g 20. the global financial and economic crisis as greatly impaired progress and growth in the countries which has a lasting impact. globally, we see a tightening of growth which is something we are very pleased to. of imf is excepting growth 3.6% and next year to 3.9%. reason for usbe a to be complacent. in europe and the united states, just as other industrializ
on the border this morning, germany's chancellor angela merck la -- delivers as new message this morning. >> and the jobs number shows the economy may finally be bouncing back after a brutal winter. it's the most jobs added in two years. thein employment rate plunged to 6.3%, the lowest it's been since 2008. february and march job totals were revised up by a combined 36,000. the average now for the last three months, 238,000 jobs, about 60,000 more than the average for the three months before. big winners by sectors include business services, retail, food services, construction and health care. bottom line, this number was much bigger than anticipated but it's not all good news. part of the reason that the unemployment rate is down is of course that the total labor force dropped again, this time by more than 800,000 in april after increasing by half a million. that total jobs number added a big deal. if you think about it over the last five years, april, may, june, every time it looked like the economy was bouncing back, they would just sort of suck the life out of the economic recovery
. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial deterioration in rush's already weak economy. we see and
that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya. general lovell was in germany awaiting orders to strike at the terrorists, orders that never came. >> what we did know quite early on is that this was a hostile action. this was no demonstration gone terribly awry. to the point of what happened, the facts led to the conclusion of a terrorist attack. the afri-con j 2 was focused on attribution. the attacks became attributable very soon after the event. >> so that means the u.s. military, the cia on the ground in libya, and pretty much everyone else directly involved with the benghazi attack knew it was not a spontaneous demonstration within hours. yet, as we proved yesterday, the obama administration created a fiction that the attack was a reaction to an anti-muslim videotape. the cover was blown off that deception this week when a memo by white house advisor ben rhodes was released through the freedom of information act. the memo clearly says that ambassador susan rice was prepped to tell the world on television that a videotape incited the murders in benghazi. incredibly,
the results from his post in germany testified before the house oversight committee and he said there should have been a military response. no one thought a video had anything to do with the attack. the attack that left four americans did including ambassador chris stevens. >> benghazi in 2012, this is the most serious of the themes. there are many sayings in the military. one saying that rings most true, you fight the way you train and in benghazi we did. many with first-hand knowledge have recounted heroism displayed bit brave americans in benghazi that night. they fought the way they trained. that's in the record. outside of libya there were discussions that churned on what we should do. these elements also fought the way they were trained. specifically the predisposition inneragency influence had the military structure in the spirit of expeditionary government support waiting for a request for assistance from the state department. there are counts of time, space and capability, discussions of the question, could we have gotten there in time to make a difference? well the discussion is no
, people lived in east germany constantly looking over their shoulder, wondering, which one of their neighbors was reporting on them. which am radplace had a microph? there were there hidden cameras? and people fought to get out of that. people lived under incredibly stress for that. and now we don't have that imposed on us by the government, although the nsa, notwithstanding, but we are rushing toward that voluntarily and delightfully, and maybe it's time we step back and say, do we really want to live in this technological panopticon? let's forget about donald sterling. put ourselves there. how many times a day do you have a private conversation that you really don't want to have recorded and then rebroadcast? and the technological element of this is what makes it really scary. we've always lived in a world where you could be talking to a trusted confidante, and they might repeat what you said. but that is markedly different from having yourself recorded or videotaped everywhere. and we are giving it away voluntarily. and maybe it's time that we realize we're at the bottom
: the general was in stuttgart, germany on the night of the attack. what he was able to see in realtime was the message traffic from libya to washington. we expect them to testify there was nothing that message traffic about a protest and nothing about the video. let's listen to congressman jason chaffetz who gave as you present violate yesterday. >> they took a country in libya and turned it into a failed state. one of the people that will be in that room is somebody who is in charge of a lot of the intelligence that they were gleaning in libya. we are going to talk about libya, where it's going, how it's become that failed state. >> reporter: if he testifies he saw nothing in the message traffic about a protest or video that will be significant. as part of our ongoing reporting at fox news we referred to a report september 17, our sources on the ground in libya also said there was no protest and fox received considerable pushback for that reporting. bill: i see darrell is a gaveling the hearing to an opening. let's rinse as this hearing begins. >> ... successes and failures of u.s. in
there. third, the largest supply of natural gas going into germany, and other eurtugal countries, they can't handle the tough sanctions if russia puts a stop to their natural gas. forthhough poland and so is tracking -- fracking a lot more. russia is the main gas supplier. we have to learn how to trade with them. of the gasesng rid from syria. they are trying to help. buy people with uneven vinegar. congress is thinking the old , back in theods 50's and 60's. it is a different time now. we are doing trade with china. but we are not doing anything with russia. they are the second strongest power in the world, and they could nuke us right off the planet. steve, what are you proposing, then? more diplomatic outreach with russia? more trade? caller: give the more say so in the g-8. wantger trade ties that we in the far east. things they want in europe and so forth. it is basic math and principles. let me bounce a few things off of you from what you said. here's daniel sanford. he covers russia, moscow for the bbc. he put this out. map of the day from the shell brochure. look at the m
's stronger than what france can do. it means that europe must have a strong growth everywhere, in germany, spain, uk, to go to converge to this target. >> do you think the french economy would be able to benefit from the growth from other countries? >> that's one of the targets of the plan is to say we tried to improve the company's situation and in that case, it will be both to capture the eurozone trajectory. that's the target of the government. >> phillip, when we tried to reform the french economy, there's always something funny or perhaps even worrying. the best reform in france is always the one that is not impacting myself. so french people are reluctant of the impact of the reform. >> it's mostly everywhere always the same thing. it's always better when your neighbor is changing its mind in this situation. what we see and what is important currently in france is that gdp per capita growth, it means that what you earn is what i lost. there's one winner, one loser. and that's why it's practically difficult at this moment of the cycle. that's why manuel vass ask ed, o try to make thi
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
. he was in east germany when it collapsed and he also saw -- you know, he had experiences there were the mob, if you like caller is trying to tear down the headquarters of the east german secret police. then, i think, you can also see after words in the 1990's he worked for the mayor of st. petersburg. i think it was quite clear from what mr. putin saw that that also was not a very clean election. i think that his attitude toward democracy, one has to look at his past and worry comes from. he is not a democrat in any western sense of the word, but russia is also not stalinist russia, even though some people describe it as such. but it is not that. the internet is pretty free. people can express different views. not on state-run to limit -- television. putin is not all-powerful in the way that probably stolen west. he is probably the single most powerful individual in the system which is not very transparent. it is a hybrid system. the groups but different people with whom he interacts and his views he does have to listen to. we can see in economic transactions he cannot determine eve
community in north carolina and bring in new recruits. they had come from germany originally, very cultured, littered, well read people. they probably were the first to bring sebastian bach. so they came to this pretty cut wild part of the north carolina piedmont. there were lorises, merchants, they educated sons and daughters. so salem prospered all through the 19th century and really something very cultured, middle-class group of people it doesn't take root until the low the 19th century, and it's attracting all of these, would not say ne'er-do-well, but these young, brash manner of did make a buck, very opportunistic. they seem to be the antithesis of everything that they have stood for. the thing about these young tobacco and textile folks coming to this town off is that they recognize in the future lies in building this manufacturing world, using the transportation up virginities of trains and advertising. even though saddam is not thrilled, it has to pay attention. they're saying to a sale on townspeople come make a look, manufacturing is the future. we have this great industrial city
their community and bring new recruits. they had come from germany originally. they were very cultured, very well read people. they probably were the first to bring the aging century america. so they came to this pretty wildly in the dark airliner piedmont in the 19th century. they educated their sons and daughters and so salem prospered through the end of the 18th century and into the 19th century and really prided themselves when things were very cultured, middle-class group of people than half a mile away we have wednesda winston that is ag all of these i wouldn't say they are due well z. is attracting bees then out to make a buck and they seem to be the antithesis of everything that we have stood for. the thing about these tobacco folks in textile folks, too for coming to winston is that they recognize that the future lies in building the manufacturing world and using the transportation opportunities of trains and using advertising and by the end of the 19th century even though ceylon isn't thrilled about the growth in the manufacturing and of the new populations that winston is drawing the s
's one in germany. there's only two really that would be available. >> thank you so much for your time. appreciate that. >> all right. >>> a teenager was stabbed to death in the stairwell of her high school on prom day. the stunned student body and police. they all want to know why. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> investigators in connecticut are trying to figure out the motive behind a deadly attack on a 16-year-old honors student. it happened yesterday at a school in milford. just about 20 miles away from newtown. police say a classmate slashed maren sanchez to death in a school stairwell. this is heartbreaking. what happened? >> she was a very popular girl. we're hearing a lot on social media from her friends and family. at about 7:00 a.m. this all unfolded in the stair
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)